Meet our team

We bring diverse experiences but agree on one thing: leave no-one behind.

Mitchell Pham: Why I think our work matters

View the script for this video

(A white background appears then black text stating “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” appears as upbeat music plays, this text then fades away. A black line then appears in the middle of the screen, above the line text appears “Mitchell Pham, Chair” and below the line “On the role of the Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand”. Music fades slightly to become faint background noise.)

“The Digital Council's job is to advise government ministers…”

(Speaker appears facing the screen, from the waist upwards and is slightly angled towards the left, white banner appears across the bottom of the screen which states “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” in the left-hand side and “Mitchell Pham, Chair, Digital Council” on the right side of the banner.)

“on issues and opportunities and challenges…”

(The camera zooms in showing the speaker from shoulders upwards, slightly angled towards the left.)

“that really matter to New Zealanders, to our economy and to our society.”

(The banner disappears from the bottom of the screen.)

“For me and the rest of the team at the Digital Council…”

(The camera zooms out to show the speaker from the waist up placed towards the right of the screen.)

“it is really important that…”

(The camera zooms in showing the speaker from the shoulders upwards, slightly angled towards the left.)

“as New Zealand continues to advance digitally…”

(The camera zooms out to show the speaker from the waist-up placed towards the right of the screen.)

“with digital and data driven technologies, that the whole of our society…”

(The camera zooms in showing the speaker from shoulders upwards, slightly angled towards the left.)

“and the whole of our economy is able to participate and benefit from all the…”

(The camera zooms out to show the speaker from the waist up placed towards the right of the screen.)

“possibilities that can come from technologies.”

(The camera zooms in showing the speaker from the shoulders upwards, slightly angled towards the left.)

“And it is absolutely crucial that we must leave no one behind.”

(A white background appears then black text stating “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” appears as upbeat music plays. The video ends.)

“It is really important that as New Zealand continues to advance digitally that the whole of our society and the whole economy is able to participate and benefit from all of the possibilities that can come from technologies.”

Digital Council Chair, Mitchell Pham, originally from Vietnam but now based in Auckland, has a career that spans software, tech, business leadership and advising industry, community and government. Mitchell is a director of Augen Software Group. He co-founded the Kiwi Connection Tech Hub and chairs NZTech and FinTechNZ.

Rachel Kelly: Why I think our work matters

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(White background appears then black text stating “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” appears as upbeat music plays, this text then fades away. Speaker appears facing the screen, from the shoulders upwards and is slightly angled towards the right. A white banner appears across the bottom of the screen which states “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” in the left-hand side and “Rachel Kelly, Digital Council” on the right side of the banner.)

"My role here is to work with the remaining six members of the team to help lift all Kiwis in the space of digital literacy, inclusion, diversity and a degree of trust in how we actually execute digital technologies in New Zealand."

(Banner disappears from the bottom of the screen and the camera zooms out slightly and the speaker is placed more towards the left side of the screen, angled slightly to the right.)

"We’re here to be the voice of New Zealand and every Kiwi in trying to actually become more productive globally in the space of digital literacy and also move from being a consumer of digital tools and products into more creators of novel and exciting ways to solve big world problems or small little daily problems to the global market using technology as a tool.

"What gets me excited about the digital world is how the tools can scale to solve really big problems. So being able to combine some amazing minds from the place like New Zealand to actually solve world problems with technology as our tool kit."

(Camera zooms in slightly with the speakers face in frame to the left side of the screen.)

"Alongside our number eight wire innovation mentality."

(White background appears then black text stating “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” appears as upbeat music plays.)

“We are tech people. But that doesn’t mean that it’s all about tech. It’s actually about how we create change and positive impact globally using technology as a tool.”

Rachel Kelly is a former scientist, strategist, business developer and marketer based in the Waikato. She is co-founder of the Waikato Technology Cluster, former Deputy Chair of NZTech and is a member of the AI Forum New Zealand Executive Council.

Marianne Elliott: Why I think our work matters

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(A white background appears then black text stating “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” appears as upbeat background music plays, this text then fades away.)

"My role involves working with the secretariat..."

(The speaker appears facing the screen, from the shoulders upwards and is slightly angled towards the right. A white banner appears across the bottom of the screen which states “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” in the left-hand side and “Marianne Elliott, Digital Council” on the right side of the banner.)

"and our research partners to undertake research to inform the advice that we give to government. I also bring a human rights perspective to the Council’s work."

(The camera zooms out to show the speaker sitting down in the middle of the screen screen, with the speaker angled towards the left making slight hand gestures as she is speaking.)

"The Council’s job is to help advise the government about ways that we can maximise the benefits of digital and data driven technologies."

(The camera zooms in showing speaker from shoulders upwards on the left side of the screen, slightly angled towards the right.)

"What excites me most about the Council is the opportunity that we have to hear from hundreds of New Zealanders from across a wide spectrum about their experiences..."

(The camera zooms out to show the speaker sitting down in the middle of the screen screen, with the speaker angled towards the left making slight hand gestures as she is speaking.)

"and their aspirations, their hopes, and their challenges around digital and data driven technologies."

(The camera zooms in showing speaker from the top of the shoulders upwards, on the left side of the screen, slightly angled towards the right.)

"And then ensuring that those insights inform the advice we give to government."

(White background appears then black text stating “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” appears as upbeat music plays.)

“What excites me the most is the opportunity to hear from New Zealanders from across the wide spectrum about their experiences and their aspirations, their hopes and their challenges around digital and data-driven technologies.”

Marianne Elliott is a trained human rights lawyer based in Wellington. She is also a researcher, writer and consultant. Marianne is the co-founder of ActionStation Aotearoa (an online campaign platform) and co-director of The Workshop (a research organisation).

Nikora Ngaropo: Why I think our work matters

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(White background appears then black text stating “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” appears as upbeat music plays, this text then fades away. Speaker appears facing the screen, from the shoulders upwards and is slightly angled towards the right. A white banner appears across the bottom of the screen which states “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” in the left hand side and “Nikora Ngaropo, Digital Council, Te Rararawa, Tūhoe, Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Kahunguru, Ngā Phui” on the right side of the banner.)

"We are growing up in a digital age our kids deal with technology every day. We are on the internet all the time."

(Camera angle zooms out to show the speaker sitting down and angled to the right. Speaker is making slight hand gestures as he is speaking.)

"Being part of the Digital Council and having a say in what we’re doing out there, how we interact with those different mediums."

(Banner disappears from bottom of the screen and the camera zooms in to show the speaker from the shoulders upwards and body slightly angled towards the right.)

"I think it is really important, now more than ever, just because of how our communities are dealing with those things. "So, what excites me about the digital world?"

(Camera angle zooms out to show speaker sitting down and angled to the right. Speaker is making slight hand gestures as he is speaking.)

"Well, for me, it’s the possibilities."

(Camera zooms in to show the speaker from the shoulders upwards and slightly angled towards the right.)

"The capability to create, to learn, to talk to people across vast distances..."

(Camera angle zooms out to show the speaker sitting down and angled to the right. Speaker is making slight hand gestures as he is speaking.)

"Solving problems and collaborating."

(Camera zooms in to show the speaker from the shoulders upwards and slightly angled towards the right.)

"It is the digital space and it’s a new world that we’re working in."

(Camera angle zooms out to show the speaker sitting down and angled to the right. Speaker is making slight hand gestures as he is speaking.)

"That’s what really excites me."

(White background appears then black text stating “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” appears as upbeat music plays.)

“I think it is vital that everyone is included in our digital future...it’s important to bring everybody along—every person, every community, at every level.”

Nikora Ngaropo, of Te Rarawa, Tūhoe, Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Kahungunu and Ngā Puhi descent, is a design and animation expert. Founder of NNMD Tech, a tech company that combines education and tech skills, he develops high-end digital and visual effects content, while also working with tamariki (children) to raise digital literacy.

Roger Dennis: Why I think our work matters

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(White background appears then black text stating “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” appears, this text then fades away. Speaker appears facing the screen, from the shoulders upwards and is slightly angled towards the left. A white banner appears across the bottom of the screen which states “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” in the left-hand side and “Roger Dennis, Digital Council” on the right side of the banner.)

"I’m Roger Dennis, and what I bring to the Council is a long term view of the world. How things are changing at the macro scale, and what that means when you start to translate it down to a country level, and what it means for the adoption and update of different technologies."

(Banner disappears from the bottom of the screen and the camera zooms out to show the speaker sitting on a chair is placed more towards the left side of the screen, with the speaker angled towards the left making slight hand gestures as he is speaking.)

"And the way I see the role of the Council is to ensure that we don’t get left behind."

(Camera zooms in to show the speaker from the shoulders upwards and slightly angled towards the left.)

"And that means both individuals and as a nation..."

(Camera zooms out to show the speaker sitting on a chair is placed towards the left side of the screen, with the speaker angled towards the left making slight hand gestures as he is speaking.)

"because as technology increases and new advances come out on a increasingly rapid basis..."

(Camera zooms in to show the speaker from the shoulders upwards and slightly angled towards the left.)

"we need to understand what we can use..."

(Camera zooms out to show the speaker sitting on a chair is placed towards the left side of the screen, with the speaker angled towards the left making slight hand gestures as he is speaking).

"what is appropriate...

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"and how we don’t get left behind, either at the national level or the individual level."

(Camera zooms out to show the speaker sitting on a chair is placed towards the middle of the screen, with the speaker angled towards the left making slight hand gestures as he is speaking.)

"What gets me excited about the digital world is..."

(Camera zooms in to show the speaker from the shoulders upwards and slightly angled towards the left.)

"the fact that I can reach into my pocket and pull out a computing device, which costs about five hundred dollars."

(Camera zooms out to show the speaker sitting on a chair placed towards the middle of the screen, with the speaker angled towards the left making slight hand gestures as he is speaking.)

"Which has more computing power in it than a super-computer did in nineteen eighty four."

(Camera zooms in to show the speaker from the shoulders upwards and slightly angled towards the left.)

"And I can talk to machines in space. That is just astonishing. And what I’m really excited about is..."

(Camera zooms out to show the speaker sitting on a chair placed towards the middle of the screen, with the speaker angled towards the left making slight hand gestures as he is speaking.)

"how do you make sure that everyone benefits from that level of advance."

(Camera zooms in to show the speaker from the shoulders upwards and slightly angled towards the left.)

"Not just a few people, but you actually create wider societal benefit."

(White background appears then black text stating “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand”.)

“How do you make sure that everyone benefits from [technological advancements]? Not just a few people, but you actually create wider social benefit?”

Roger Dennis, based in Christchurch, is a consultant specialising in innovation and large-scale change.

Kendall Flutey

Close up picture on Kendall Flutey looking at camera

“A digitally empowered Aotearoa is exciting, but only when we're all thriving. I was drawn to this kaupapa as it ensures our path is thoughtful, intentional, and prosperous for all Kiwis.”

Kendall Flutey (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairarapa) is a trained accountant and former web developer. She was Young Māori Business Leader of the Year in 2018 and Young New Zealander of the Year in 2019. She founded the education tech start up Banqer, which teaches young Kiwis about money and personal finance.

Colin Gavaghan: Why I think our work matters

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(White background appears then black text stating “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” appears as upbeat music plays, this text then fades away. Speaker appears facing the screen, from the shoulders upwards and is slightly angled towards the left.)

"I’m Colin Gavaghan. I am a professor down at the University of Otago and my work there involves looking at the kind of law and ethical implications of new technologies."

(Camera zooms out and shows speaker sitting down, angled towards the left.)

"What kind of rules we’d want to get the best out of these technologies and to avoid some of the pitfalls."

(Camera zooms in to show the speaker from the shoulders upwards and slightly angled towards the left.)

"I guess my role in the Digital Council is to bring some of that research to a wider audience of New Zealanders. Out of the ivory towers of academia, and onto the streets to speak to ordinary people."

(Camera zooms out and shows speaker sitting down, angled towards the left, hands rested in front of him.)

"But just as importantly as that is the chance to hear from those people, to hear what kind of hopes and fears they have for digital technologies.

"The excitement about the Council is really the chance to take ideas that typically are confined to academic journals and books, and actually make them real for ordinary members of society."

(White background appears then black text stating “Digital Council for Aotearoa New Zealand” appears as upbeat music plays.)

“I think New Zealanders don’t have a choice but to care about our digital future and in fact our digital present. More and more of our lives are being spent with at least one foot in the digital world.”

Colin Gavaghan chairs the New Zealand Law Foundation’s Law and Emerging Technologies Centre at the University of Otago, where he researches and lectures in medical and criminal law.